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How do I withdraw my Citizenship Application?
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y2late

Mississauga
60 Posts

Posted - 07/17/2009 :  12:11:45  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hello All

Could someone please let me know what is the procedure to withdraw the application?

We have been asked for RQ after the test and we don’t have enough supporting documents t prove the residency requirements.

I feel that it’s better to collect all the paper work and start all over again then to go through this pain of waiting game.

I would truly appreciate all your suggestions in this matter.

Regards

Y2Late

mohammedessam

Whitby
14 Posts

Posted - 07/17/2009 :  13:43:46  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I believe you have to send a letter to the Sydni cic explaining why you want to withdraw, make sure to include all of your details including you client number

y2late

Mississauga
60 Posts

Posted - 07/17/2009 :  14:25:34  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hello MohhamedEssam

Thanks for your quick response.

Mailing address will be the same as where the original Citizenship application was mailed?

Regards
Y2late


raoshrini

toronto
46 Posts

Posted - 07/21/2009 :  21:12:11  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
as per CIC operational manual,

9.3. Policy

The Citizenship Act does not specifically address a situation where an applicant decides to voluntarily withdraw their citizenship application. However, because the citizenship legislation does not constrain the applicant's discretion to withdraw their application, CIC policy is to permit
the applicant the opportunity to withdraw their application should they decide it is in their best interest to do so. Since it is the applicant who may decide to withdraw their citizenship application, at their discretion, citizenship officials should generally avoid recommending that an applicant withdraw their application to avoid the perception that the decision to withdraw was influenced or made for the benefit of CIC or citizenship officials.

In general, unless the applicant no longer wishes to become a Canadian citizen or continue to pursue their application, the applicant does not benefit from withdrawing their application. An applicant who withdraws their application loses the right to appeal a decision. Whether an application is withdrawn or non-approved, the client is refunded the $100 Right of Citizenship fee.

By withdrawing, the applicant loses an opportunity to be counselled in an in-person setting on when they will be eligible to apply, and also forfeits the opportunity to have their application assessed against the legislative requirements, which may help the applicant identify areas where the applicant is weak and could be better prepared for the next time they apply.

It is possible that an applicant is not aware that withdrawing their application is an option which provides a solution in particular circumstances. Therefore, there may be situations where CIC officials may suggest a withdrawal, such as in the following circumstances:

• the applicant informs the citizenship office that they will not be available to pursue their application and will continue to be unavailable for the foreseeable future (e.g., for the next six months or longer);

• the applicant has changed their mind about becoming a Canadian citizen (for example, the applicant has just realized that they will lose their current citizenship, or they no longer wish to give up their current citizenship).




9.4. General rules for grant and proof withdrawals
An applicant can withdraw an application for any reason and at any time before the person becomes a citizen by taking the oath of citizenship.
Withdrawals of applications must be done in writing either by using the appropriate withdrawal form, or by sending a letter to citizenship authorities requesting withdrawal of the application.
Withdrawals on behalf of minors must be done by a parent or legal guardian. If the concerned minor is older than 14, the minor should countersign the request for withdrawal, if possible.
Before returning the file to CPC Sydney for file retirement, review the file to assess if it needs to be referred to Case Management for review under Section 29.

9.5. When refunds are paid to grant and proof applicants
Refund the Application Processing fee only if:
• CIC is able to confirm the applicant received incorrect information about applying from either a CIC official or a foreign service officer.

• the applicant dies before a decision is made or a proof certificate issued. The request for the refund must come from a spouse, parent, or executor and include a copy of the death
certificate. The refund is paid to the applicant's estate.

shrini


vc1bar

TORONTO
7 Posts

Posted - 07/23/2009 :  02:19:51  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
hi y2late,

i sent you an email. check it.

my interview went just fine. i dont think you should withdraw ur wife's application. her case could still be better than mine.



y2late

Mississauga
60 Posts

Posted - 07/23/2009 :  11:30:51  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi V1Cbar

Thank you very much!!! You have really been extremely helpful!! I have just responded to your mail.

Regards
Y2Late


PK177

TORONTO
1 Posts

Posted - 12/24/2009 :  09:06:41  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
vc1bar and y2late
Can anyone of you let me know how is you interview go with the juge after submitting your RQs. I have a same situation as you had. Waiting for your response,desperately.
Thanks


downtown25

toronto
12 Posts

Posted - 12/25/2009 :  03:36:50  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
PK177, why did you get RQ? Please share the reason. Thnaks

quote:

vc1bar and y2late
Can anyone of you let me know how is you interview go with the juge after submitting your RQs. I have a same situation as you had. Waiting for your response,desperately.
Thanks




saloul

oakville
1 Posts

Posted - 12/13/2010 :  13:48:28  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I first landed on June 2006 with my 6 moths pregnant wife and my 4 years son,

at that time we had no one in Canada so on September 2006 we decided to go back home so my wife can give birth to my second son among her sisters, mother and family, we took that decision so that I can take good care of her and the newly borne son in his first few days in life,

at that time me and my wife had a long argument and then agreed to leave my newly born son here with my mother until he learn our native language and the fundamentals of our religion, that usually takes about 5 years,

after about 40 days of the birth we came back to Canada and lived our life normally but never got a job, to be frank with you, I was not so sure about all this,

so I kept my real-estate and my investments alive back home, the income was quite good and it was deposited on a monthly basis into my old home bank account and I used my ATM to cash my money in Canada, so didn't really need a job, any way ,

we spent 4 long years here ,Of course we went back home a couple of times to visit our son and family.

I applied for citizenship last year 2009 and was requested in November 2010 to write the citizenship test, when I went to the office I was asked about my sons, I told the officer that I have two sons, one is her with me and the other is back home with my mother, she was shocked!!

"How could you leave your son for 4 years?!" she was yelling, I explained to her our circumstances but she did not believe me, I tried to show her my income Tax bills for the last 3 years but she didn't give me a chance, instead she gave us an RQ!

The RQ requests so many documents which some of them are impossible to collect, such as employment documents, since, as I mentioned before I was never employed, on that day we did write the test,

It was very simple, I think I had a full mark, any ways I decided to withdraw my application and go back home to my old business, family and friends and thanks God I kept my old business active, other wise I would be now in a huge trouble.

I might apply again in the future when my boys are old enough to understand the differences between communities standards, Canada is a nice country but it is a very expensive place and not the perfect place to raise a child.


iffiboy

Toronto
1 Posts

Posted - 05/07/2013 :  17:39:11  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
thank you for the info
Do I need to mention the reason for the withdrawl?
or simply a case of this type can be withdrawn by a simple request...
thank you
quote:

as per CIC operational manual,

9.3. Policy

The Citizenship Act does not specifically address a situation where an applicant decides to voluntarily withdraw their citizenship application. However, because the citizenship legislation does not constrain the applicant's discretion to withdraw their application, CIC policy is to permit
the applicant the opportunity to withdraw their application should they decide it is in their best interest to do so. Since it is the applicant who may decide to withdraw their citizenship application, at their discretion, citizenship officials should generally avoid recommending that an applicant withdraw their application to avoid the perception that the decision to withdraw was influenced or made for the benefit of CIC or citizenship officials.

In general, unless the applicant no longer wishes to become a Canadian citizen or continue to pursue their application, the applicant does not benefit from withdrawing their application. An applicant who withdraws their application loses the right to appeal a decision. Whether an application is withdrawn or non-approved, the client is refunded the $100 Right of Citizenship fee.

By withdrawing, the applicant loses an opportunity to be counselled in an in-person setting on when they will be eligible to apply, and also forfeits the opportunity to have their application assessed against the legislative requirements, which may help the applicant identify areas where the applicant is weak and could be better prepared for the next time they apply.

It is possible that an applicant is not aware that withdrawing their application is an option which provides a solution in particular circumstances. Therefore, there may be situations where CIC officials may suggest a withdrawal, such as in the following circumstances:

• the applicant informs the citizenship office that they will not be available to pursue their application and will continue to be unavailable for the foreseeable future (e.g., for the next six months or longer);

• the applicant has changed their mind about becoming a Canadian citizen (for example, the applicant has just realized that they will lose their current citizenship, or they no longer wish to give up their current citizenship).




9.4. General rules for grant and proof withdrawals
An applicant can withdraw an application for any reason and at any time before the person becomes a citizen by taking the oath of citizenship.
Withdrawals of applications must be done in writing either by using the appropriate withdrawal form, or by sending a letter to citizenship authorities requesting withdrawal of the application.
Withdrawals on behalf of minors must be done by a parent or legal guardian. If the concerned minor is older than 14, the minor should countersign the request for withdrawal, if possible.
Before returning the file to CPC Sydney for file retirement, review the file to assess if it needs to be referred to Case Management for review under Section 29.

9.5. When refunds are paid to grant and proof applicants
Refund the Application Processing fee only if:
• CIC is able to confirm the applicant received incorrect information about applying from either a CIC official or a foreign service officer.

• the applicant dies before a decision is made or a proof certificate issued. The request for the refund must come from a spouse, parent, or executor and include a copy of the death
certificate. The refund is paid to the applicant's estate.

shrini



iffiboyca


   
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