Share This: 

What is the difference between college and university in Canada?

Universities focus on academic and professional programs. Colleges focus more on career training and trades.

The words "college" and "university" have different meanings in different English-speaking countries. In Canada, colleges and universities are different institutions - usually, colleges have different kinds of programs than universities do.

Colleges

Colleges of applied arts and technology have full-time and part-time diploma and certificate programs. Many also offer Bachelor degrees in applied areas of study.

Colleges tend to be more directly career-oriented than universities. This means they offer practical or hands-on training. Generally, a certificate program is 1 year or less, and a diploma program is 2 or 3 years.

Colleges also have pre-trades and apprenticeship training, language training and skills upgrading.

Some Ontario colleges focus on agriculture, health science, art or military programs.

Universities

Universities are institutions that can grant degrees. All universities have undergraduate (bachelor's) degrees, and many have graduate (Master's and doctoral) programs. Universities in Ontario are independent. Although they receive funding from the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities, each institution is self-governing and regulates its own programs, admissions and faculty.

Undergraduate degrees usually take 3-4 years to complete, if you study full-time. An "honours degree" (the fourth year) is usually required if you want to go to a graduate program (Master's degree). Many universities allow students to combine subject areas (e.g., a Bachelor of Science in Chemistry and Biology) into a "double major."

Many universities also offer professional programs, such as medicine, dentistry and law. In some cases, you can begin these programs after 2 or 3 years of undergraduate study.

An educational institution cannot grant a degree in Ontario unless the provincial government has given it this right. There are private institutions in Ontario that have been given partial degree-granting authority. All of these schools are denominational, which means that they have a religious affiliation.

For more information

Last Updated: December 22, 2011
In My Language

    Visit InMyLanguage.org to read this article in:

Arabic
Arabic
Chinese (Simplified)
Chinese (Simplified)
French
French
Gujarati
Gujarati
Pilipino (Tagalog)
Pilipino (Tagalog)
Punjabi
Punjabi
Russian
Russian
Spanish
Spanish
Tamil
Tamil
Urdu
Urdu
Follow Us